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No Place Like Nome: New Life for an Abandoned North Dakota Schoolhouse

It had been years since the former students of the only school in Nome, North Dakota had been back in their gymnasium. A mixture...

The Attraction of Food Service Work Is Plummeting. And Delivery Robots are Thriving.

You’re writing an essay in the campus library when your stomach rumbles. You pull out your phone and order pizza from the dining hall...

After Industry: Cleveland’s Renaissance as the Rust Belt Poster Child

On July 2, it was cloudy in New York City. The city’s official Twitter account, which has over 1 million followers, commented on the...

Engineer Misako Hata on Innovating to Help Rural Ohio’s Small Businesses Thrive

In 2018, Athens, Ohio was ranked the poorest county in the state with a poverty rate of 30.6%. Located in the heart of Appalachia,...

How Wisconsin Ginseng Became a Globally Coveted Commodity

Most people know Wisconsin for its cheese—an aged cheddar in a bright red wax or an absurdly cartoonish cheese block in hat form if...

Beyond the Ruins: Toward a New Midwest Architecture (on Twitter)

Situated between a Simpsons screencap and a Suez Canal meme, an old picture of a familiar YMCA in Port Huron, Michigan populates my Twitter...

Building the Midwest’s “Little Tokyo” in Novi, Michigan

Michigan may not seem to be the most likely place for authentic Asian cuisine and experiences, but developers and city leaders in the city of Novi hope that Sakura Novi, a new mixed-use development featuring Japanese and other Asian businesses, will foster cross-cultural connections and support the Asian expatriate community there. The development will be the first of its kind in Michigan and one of only a few in the Midwest. Cover graphic courtesy of sakuranovi.com.

Perspectives on a Post-pandemic Higher Education System

Rapid global and societal shifts have forced higher education institutions to adapt and address existing issues that otherwise may have dragged on in ongoing...
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“Playing more freely” | Zak Vassar & Chris Anderson

As concert halls and jazz bars closed amidst the pandemic, the music community had to find new ways to bring music to people. In doing so, they’ve also opened up doors to broader audiences. Midstory talks to Zak Vassar, President and CEO of the Toledo Symphony Orchestra, and Chris Anderson, founder of Open Tone Music, about how the pandemic changed our access to music—for the worse, but also for the better.

Nine Miles: Disciplinary Action Across Racial Lines in Northwest Indiana

Merrillville High School and Crown Point High School sit nine miles apart from one another in Lake County, Indiana. Both serving a student population...

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