Amidst severe crises, the world of journalism has changed—for better and for worse. There are struggles with aging organizational models and, even more so, in the fundamental role of news in an ever-changing world. The Local Journalism Project is an investigation of the current state of local journalism, with a focus on the Midwest, exploring causes of decline and possibilities for restoration & innovation.

As protests and unrest continue, Midstory considers the Midwestern identity and the role the region has historically played in civil rights progress.

Amidst ever-increasing globalization, American audiences are slowly beginning to recognize international film industries, as evidenced by South Korea’s Parasite (2019) being the first non-English-language film to win the Academy Award for Best Picture. As production companies pull rights for their content to start their own streaming services, platforms like Amazon Prime Video have found competitive avenues through hosting international films and television (think K-drama and European crime shows), opening up accessibility to global film industries.

What does transportation look like from here? In the first installment in a series examining the future of public transit post-COVID-19, Midstory Fellow Stefan Binion talks with Stu Nicholson, Executive Director of All Aboard Ohio!, about what current discussions are amidst the pandemic and re-opening, from accessibility to the environment.

Connie Schultz’s debut novel intricately showcases not only the hardships, but also the dignity and resilience of the lives of small, working-class, Midwestern towns and the women who inhabit them.

As COVID-19 cases rise across the nation, masks (and requiring citizens to wear them) have become a major point of contention. We speak with Dr. Jeffrey Shaman, a professor of environmental health sciences and an infectious disease modeler at the Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health, about the use of masks and other ways to slow and prevent the transmission of COVID-19.

For decades, the Midwest was the example of perfect, accent-less English. Now, increasing dialectic quirks are changing that perception, and with it, Midwestern identity.

Through conversations with her grandfather, the author unpacks his personal history during the Civil Rights Movement and the Great Migration—one that paved the way for generations to come. Read his story and listen to excerpts from the interview.

Don’t cry over spilled milk? Well, maybe we should. COVID-19 is forcing us to re-examine systems that have been in place for hundreds of years, including the grocery. But the grocery storefront is just a window into the unprecedented social and economic pressures we are facing as global citizens. In this two-part series, we talk about the evolution of the grocery store and how the current crisis is affecting the massive food network behind it.

Toledo has some name recognition (Holy Toledo!, anyone?), but most know very little about the Glass City besides what they may see on TV. When has Toledo made it to the big screen and how does TV influence the way the world sees Toledo, for better or for worse?

The path that brought us to Toledo was a winding one. In a way, you could say that we were brought here by the birth of our first child. Our beautiful baby girl was born on the evening of August 20th, 2016 in Bismarck, North Dakota.

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Amidst severe crises, the world of journalism has changed—for better and for worse. There are struggles with aging organizational models and, even more so, in the fundamental role of news in an ever-changing world.

Image is not available

As protests and unrest continue, Midstory considers the Midwestern identity and the role the region has historically played in civil rights progress.

Image is not available

Amidst ever-increasing globalization, American audiences are slowly beginning to recognize international film industries, as evidenced by South Korea’s Parasite (2019) being the first non-English-language film to win the Academy Award for Best Picture.

Image is not available

What does transportation look like from here? In the first installment in a series examining the future of public transit post-COVID-19.

Image is not available

Connie Schultz’s debut novel intricately showcases not only the hardships, but also the dignity and resilience of the lives of small, working-class, Midwestern towns and the women who inhabit them.

Image is not available

As COVID-19 cases rise across the nation, masks (and requiring citizens to wear them) have become a major point of contention. We speak with Dr. Jeffrey Shaman (Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health) about the use of masks and other ways to slow and prevent the transmission of COVID-19.

Image is not available

In 2014, more than half a million people were left without clean drinking water for three days after a harmful algal bloom took over Lake Erie. But behind the bloom is a history long-forgotten and a hopeful future of coexistence and collaboration. This film is the result of a 2019 collaboration with WGTE Public Media.

Image is not available

For decades, the Midwest was the example of perfect, accent-less English. Now, increasing dialectic quirks are changing that perception, and with it, Midwestern identity.

Image is not available

Through conversations with her grandfather, the author unpacks his personal history during the Civil Rights Movement and the Great Migration—one that paved the way for generations to come. Read his story and listen to excerpts from the interview.

Image is not available

The Mid-weekly is a newsletter feature produced by our team to provide up-to-date content from our staff directly to your inbox. Consider supporting our 501(c)(3) by subscribing to the newsletter! View sample issue here.

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Don’t cry over spilled milk? Well, maybe we should. COVID-19 is forcing us to re-examine systems that have been in place for hundreds of years, including the grocery.

Image is not available

Toledo has some name recognition (Holy Toledo!, anyone?), but most know very little about the Glass City besides what they see on TV. When has Toledo made it to the big screen and how does TV influence the way the world sees Toledo, for better or for worse?

Image is not available

The U.S. employs over 18 million health care professionals. Let's keep them safe. #StayAtHome #SaveLives #InThisTogether

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The path that brought us to Toledo was a winding one. In a way, you could say that we were brought here by the birth of our first child. Our beautiful baby girl was born on the evening of August 20th, 2016 in Bismarck, North Dakota.

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The Next Great Migration: Where Young Black Graduates See Their Futures

Over the past two centuries, African Americans have steadily migrated from the South to other regions in the United States, often because of entrenched traditions of racism, segregation and scarcity of opportunity for economic and social mobility, evidenced by movements such as the Great Migration. Shortly after the end of the Great Migration, a new trend began: the Reverse...

Black Voices in Ohio Journalism

In celebration of Black History Month, take a look at just a few of the historical figures who trailblazed for Black voices in journalism in Ohio and beyond.

Weight of Sound, Ep. 1: Bruckner Symphonies

In episode 1 of Weight of Sound, Toledo Symphony Orchestra President Emeritus Bob Bell discusses his decades-long connection with Bruckner symphonies as an audience member, a percussionist and a community leader: "We want quick satisfaction—whatever we want to do we want to always go as fast as we can. Bruckner’s music is for another time. Things are a little slower and more lofty in a way. But every bit is relevant today as ever..."

After Industry: The Unusual Rebirth of Mansfield, Ohio

Nestled in the center of Northern Ohio, Mansfield has fallen in and out of fame over the years. Now, however, the small city perhaps most well known for being the backdrop for The Shawshank Redemption is making use of its post-industrial heritage for an unlikely comeback industry: tourism.  The city first made a name for itself in the 19th century...

Editor's Picks

Are We Still “Draining”?: An Introduction to The Demography Project

The Toledo Demography Project is a collaborative effort between the Midstory team and researchers from various universities in the region. Lead researchers on the project are Victor Ogundipe, a Data Analytics Lead at the University of Michigan, and Mingyang Liu, a survey statistician in the Office of Institutional Research at the University of Toledo.
00:25:16

COVID-19 Update: “No economy should override a human life”

From the Midstory Studio, our team chats with health care professional Lauren Uhrman to get an update on the most recent national and local information and discussions on COVID-19, including infection rates and new symptoms, current local and national policy and preventative measures, what the current PPE situation is like in hospitals, whether someone can actually be "re-infected," how the American public is doing with "social distancing" and what we all can be doing better to help fight the spread. Special thanks to Lauren Uhrman for being featured in this update.

Mobility in Crisis, Part I: Public Health, Transit and Investment

From airlines to subways, mass transit is particularly ill-suited to the social distancing practices that help stem COVID-19’s spread, so it doesn’t come as a shock that the transportation sector has struggled to navigate the pandemic. And for transit systems nationwide, it’s a bitter pill to swallow: where public transportation was most successful, it now seems most threatening—and threatened.

Becoming Michael’s, from Ellis Island to Toledo

When I was in third grade, I remember my parents being asked at a parent-teacher conference why I always talked about “hanging out at the bar.” On the one...

Rustbelt Coffee: Brewing Post-industrial Authenticity

The endless rectangles of glass skyscrapers reflect light onto empty pavement. One parking lot, however, houses cars continuously. This stubby brick building might struggle to match the heights of...

Latest COVID-19 Updates

Young Black graduates from the Midwest are envisioning their futures elsewhere. Where will the next generation migrate and what does that mean for the region's future?
https://www.midstory.org/the-next-great-migration-where-young-black-graduates-see-their-futures/

Experience our 2020 with us as we reflect on how the world shifted—and how we shifted alongside it. 🌎

In lieu of an “annual report,” we’ve curated a digital journey at http://www.midstory.org/2020.

𝗧𝗵𝗶𝘀 𝘄𝗲𝗲𝗸’𝘀 𝗳𝗼𝗰𝘂𝘀: Daily COVID-19 cases and vaccination rates in Ohio, as well as cases in the U.S. compared to last week.

𝙏𝙖𝙠𝙚𝙖𝙬𝙖𝙮𝙨:
- Over the past seven weeks, new cases of COVID-19 in Ohio continue to decline.

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