Amidst severe crises, the world of journalism has changed—for better and for worse. There are struggles with aging organizational models and, even more so, in the fundamental role of news in an ever-changing world. The Local Journalism Project is an investigation of the current state of local journalism, with a focus on the Midwest, exploring causes of decline and possibilities for restoration & innovation.

As protests and unrest continue, Midstory considers the Midwestern identity and the role the region has historically played in civil rights progress.

Amidst ever-increasing globalization, American audiences are slowly beginning to recognize international film industries, as evidenced by South Korea’s Parasite (2019) being the first non-English-language film to win the Academy Award for Best Picture. As production companies pull rights for their content to start their own streaming services, platforms like Amazon Prime Video have found competitive avenues through hosting international films and television (think K-drama and European crime shows), opening up accessibility to global film industries.

What does transportation look like from here? In the first installment in a series examining the future of public transit post-COVID-19, Midstory Fellow Stefan Binion talks with Stu Nicholson, Executive Director of All Aboard Ohio!, about what current discussions are amidst the pandemic and re-opening, from accessibility to the environment.

Connie Schultz’s debut novel intricately showcases not only the hardships, but also the dignity and resilience of the lives of small, working-class, Midwestern towns and the women who inhabit them.

As COVID-19 cases rise across the nation, masks (and requiring citizens to wear them) have become a major point of contention. We speak with Dr. Jeffrey Shaman, a professor of environmental health sciences and an infectious disease modeler at the Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health, about the use of masks and other ways to slow and prevent the transmission of COVID-19.

For decades, the Midwest was the example of perfect, accent-less English. Now, increasing dialectic quirks are changing that perception, and with it, Midwestern identity.

Through conversations with her grandfather, the author unpacks his personal history during the Civil Rights Movement and the Great Migration—one that paved the way for generations to come. Read his story and listen to excerpts from the interview.

Don’t cry over spilled milk? Well, maybe we should. COVID-19 is forcing us to re-examine systems that have been in place for hundreds of years, including the grocery. But the grocery storefront is just a window into the unprecedented social and economic pressures we are facing as global citizens. In this two-part series, we talk about the evolution of the grocery store and how the current crisis is affecting the massive food network behind it.

Toledo has some name recognition (Holy Toledo!, anyone?), but most know very little about the Glass City besides what they may see on TV. When has Toledo made it to the big screen and how does TV influence the way the world sees Toledo, for better or for worse?

The path that brought us to Toledo was a winding one. In a way, you could say that we were brought here by the birth of our first child. Our beautiful baby girl was born on the evening of August 20th, 2016 in Bismarck, North Dakota.

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Amidst severe crises, the world of journalism has changed—for better and for worse. There are struggles with aging organizational models and, even more so, in the fundamental role of news in an ever-changing world.

Image is not available

As protests and unrest continue, Midstory considers the Midwestern identity and the role the region has historically played in civil rights progress.

Image is not available

Amidst ever-increasing globalization, American audiences are slowly beginning to recognize international film industries, as evidenced by South Korea’s Parasite (2019) being the first non-English-language film to win the Academy Award for Best Picture.

Image is not available

What does transportation look like from here? In the first installment in a series examining the future of public transit post-COVID-19.

Image is not available

Connie Schultz’s debut novel intricately showcases not only the hardships, but also the dignity and resilience of the lives of small, working-class, Midwestern towns and the women who inhabit them.

Image is not available

As COVID-19 cases rise across the nation, masks (and requiring citizens to wear them) have become a major point of contention. We speak with Dr. Jeffrey Shaman (Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health) about the use of masks and other ways to slow and prevent the transmission of COVID-19.

Image is not available

In 2014, more than half a million people were left without clean drinking water for three days after a harmful algal bloom took over Lake Erie. But behind the bloom is a history long-forgotten and a hopeful future of coexistence and collaboration. This film is the result of a 2019 collaboration with WGTE Public Media.

Image is not available

For decades, the Midwest was the example of perfect, accent-less English. Now, increasing dialectic quirks are changing that perception, and with it, Midwestern identity.

Image is not available

Through conversations with her grandfather, the author unpacks his personal history during the Civil Rights Movement and the Great Migration—one that paved the way for generations to come. Read his story and listen to excerpts from the interview.

Image is not available

The Mid-weekly is a newsletter feature produced by our team to provide up-to-date content from our staff directly to your inbox. Consider supporting our 501(c)(3) by subscribing to the newsletter! View sample issue here.

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Don’t cry over spilled milk? Well, maybe we should. COVID-19 is forcing us to re-examine systems that have been in place for hundreds of years, including the grocery.

Image is not available

Toledo has some name recognition (Holy Toledo!, anyone?), but most know very little about the Glass City besides what they see on TV. When has Toledo made it to the big screen and how does TV influence the way the world sees Toledo, for better or for worse?

Image is not available

The U.S. employs over 18 million health care professionals. Let's keep them safe. #StayAtHome #SaveLives #InThisTogether

Image is not available

The path that brought us to Toledo was a winding one. In a way, you could say that we were brought here by the birth of our first child. Our beautiful baby girl was born on the evening of August 20th, 2016 in Bismarck, North Dakota.

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The Latest
Creative Multimedia Storytelling + Solutions-oriented Projects

Perspectives on a Post-pandemic Higher Education System

Rapid global and societal shifts have forced higher education institutions to adapt and address existing issues that otherwise may have dragged on in ongoing bureaucratic gridlock. As the pandemic continues to challenge campus life, administrators, professors and students alike are reconsidering how issues like student debt, student homelessness and food insecurity affect campus populations (often unequally across racial and...
00:22:19

“Playing more freely” | Zak Vassar & Chris Anderson

As concert halls and jazz bars closed amidst the pandemic, the music community had to find new ways to bring music to people. In doing so, they’ve also opened up doors to broader audiences. Midstory talks to Zak Vassar, President and CEO of the Toledo Symphony Orchestra, and Chris Anderson, founder of Open Tone Music, about how the pandemic changed our access to music—for the worse, but also for the better.

Nine Miles: Disciplinary Action Across Racial Lines in Northwest Indiana

Merrillville High School and Crown Point High School sit nine miles apart from one another in Lake County, Indiana. Both serving a student population of over 2,000 each, their racial and socioeconomic demographics put the two schools at opposite ends of the spectrum. Merrillville, located in a more urban district and praised for its diversity, has a student body...

Dear Erie III.

As the Great Black Swamp was drained and cut down acre by acre, a manmade tile and ditch system took its place. At the turn of the 19th century, a machine worker from Bowling Green invented the steam-powered Buckeye Trencher that helped industrialize Northwest Ohio and beyond. By 1920, 15,000 of the 20,000 miles of ditches in the state...
00:20:28

“Comforted in the darkness of grief” | Dave Lucas

In the isolation and grief of 2020, we turned to the written word to find connections that transcend time and space. Midstory talks to Dave Lucas, the second Poet Laureate of Ohio and lecturer at Case Western Reserve University, about the ways writing and poetry provide solace, wisdom and clarity far beyond what we (and perhaps the authors) could have imagined.

Editor's Picks

Trailblazers of the Great Black Swamp: 31 Miles, 31 Taverns

If you’ve ever driven from Perrysburg to Fremont or Fremont to Perrysburg—or anywhere along the way, for that matter—you’ve experienced a pleasant, roughly 40-minute drive that’s a straight shot...

The Midwestern Mall: Not Quite Gone and Not Quite Forgotten

For the last several decades, malls across the country have been closing one after another, leaving behind not only abandoned buildings, but also renewed interest in what malls mean to people, why they are disappearing in the first place and what can be done to save them (or if they should be saved at all). Toledo, Ohio, for example, remains enamored with the memory of its long-gone shopping complexes and what they meant for a thriving, mid-sized, Midwestern city. Cover graphic by Jessie Walton for Midstory.
00:01:29

Martin Luther King, Jr.’s Toledo Legacy

While Martin Luther King, Jr. only visited Toledo once, his name, influence and image remain in this city as remnants of the values he lived and died for. Some...
00:02:46

All Aboard: Reimagining Toledo & Its Union Station

A few specks of dust hang in the air of Toledo’s train station, still and silent, exposed by a light that gleams from the nearby window. “Peaceful” and “pristine”...

War! Who Is It Good For? A Review of Da 5 Bloods

Da 5 Bloods, this June’s Netflix-exclusive Spike Lee joint, opens with archival footage from the American Civil Rights Movement and the Vietnam War, prophetically resonating with the current political...

Latest COVID-19 Updates

𝗧𝗵𝗶𝘀 𝘄𝗲𝗲𝗸’𝘀 𝗳𝗼𝗰𝘂𝘀: COVID-19 vaccination rates per state and how COVID-19 deaths compare to seasonal influenza deaths.

𝙏𝙖𝙠𝙚𝙖𝙬𝙖𝙮𝙨:
- After an uptick in new cases of COVID-19 in recent weeks, daily cases continue in an overall trend of decline.

In the isolation & grief of 2020, we turned to the written word. Midstory talks to @FakeDaveLucas, Ohio's 2nd Poet Laureate & lecturer at @cwru, about how poetry can provide solace & wisdom far beyond what we (and perhaps the authors) could have imagined. https://social-distances.captivate.fm/

"Award-winning scientist Rattan Lal’s fascination with soil goes back to childhood on his family’s farm in India..." https://www.midstory.org/ohio-scientist-rattan-lal-on-how-soil-could-help-solve-global-environmental-crises/

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Videos that explore the post-industrial landscape and the many narratives within

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Solutions-oriented, research-based projects in collaboration with leading experts and academics

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