Amidst severe crises, the world of journalism has changed—for better and for worse. There are struggles with aging organizational models and, even more so, in the fundamental role of news in an ever-changing world. The Local Journalism Project is an investigation of the current state of local journalism, with a focus on the Midwest, exploring causes of decline and possibilities for restoration & innovation.

As protests and unrest continue, Midstory considers the Midwestern identity and the role the region has historically played in civil rights progress.

Amidst ever-increasing globalization, American audiences are slowly beginning to recognize international film industries, as evidenced by South Korea’s Parasite (2019) being the first non-English-language film to win the Academy Award for Best Picture. As production companies pull rights for their content to start their own streaming services, platforms like Amazon Prime Video have found competitive avenues through hosting international films and television (think K-drama and European crime shows), opening up accessibility to global film industries.

What does transportation look like from here? In the first installment in a series examining the future of public transit post-COVID-19, Midstory Fellow Stefan Binion talks with Stu Nicholson, Executive Director of All Aboard Ohio!, about what current discussions are amidst the pandemic and re-opening, from accessibility to the environment.

Connie Schultz’s debut novel intricately showcases not only the hardships, but also the dignity and resilience of the lives of small, working-class, Midwestern towns and the women who inhabit them.

As COVID-19 cases rise across the nation, masks (and requiring citizens to wear them) have become a major point of contention. We speak with Dr. Jeffrey Shaman, a professor of environmental health sciences and an infectious disease modeler at the Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health, about the use of masks and other ways to slow and prevent the transmission of COVID-19.

For decades, the Midwest was the example of perfect, accent-less English. Now, increasing dialectic quirks are changing that perception, and with it, Midwestern identity.

Through conversations with her grandfather, the author unpacks his personal history during the Civil Rights Movement and the Great Migration—one that paved the way for generations to come. Read his story and listen to excerpts from the interview.

Don’t cry over spilled milk? Well, maybe we should. COVID-19 is forcing us to re-examine systems that have been in place for hundreds of years, including the grocery. But the grocery storefront is just a window into the unprecedented social and economic pressures we are facing as global citizens. In this two-part series, we talk about the evolution of the grocery store and how the current crisis is affecting the massive food network behind it.

Toledo has some name recognition (Holy Toledo!, anyone?), but most know very little about the Glass City besides what they may see on TV. When has Toledo made it to the big screen and how does TV influence the way the world sees Toledo, for better or for worse?

The path that brought us to Toledo was a winding one. In a way, you could say that we were brought here by the birth of our first child. Our beautiful baby girl was born on the evening of August 20th, 2016 in Bismarck, North Dakota.

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Amidst severe crises, the world of journalism has changed—for better and for worse. There are struggles with aging organizational models and, even more so, in the fundamental role of news in an ever-changing world.

Image is not available

As protests and unrest continue, Midstory considers the Midwestern identity and the role the region has historically played in civil rights progress.

Image is not available

Amidst ever-increasing globalization, American audiences are slowly beginning to recognize international film industries, as evidenced by South Korea’s Parasite (2019) being the first non-English-language film to win the Academy Award for Best Picture.

Image is not available

What does transportation look like from here? In the first installment in a series examining the future of public transit post-COVID-19.

Image is not available

Connie Schultz’s debut novel intricately showcases not only the hardships, but also the dignity and resilience of the lives of small, working-class, Midwestern towns and the women who inhabit them.

Image is not available

As COVID-19 cases rise across the nation, masks (and requiring citizens to wear them) have become a major point of contention. We speak with Dr. Jeffrey Shaman (Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health) about the use of masks and other ways to slow and prevent the transmission of COVID-19.

Image is not available

In 2014, more than half a million people were left without clean drinking water for three days after a harmful algal bloom took over Lake Erie. But behind the bloom is a history long-forgotten and a hopeful future of coexistence and collaboration. This film is the result of a 2019 collaboration with WGTE Public Media.

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For decades, the Midwest was the example of perfect, accent-less English. Now, increasing dialectic quirks are changing that perception, and with it, Midwestern identity.

Image is not available

Through conversations with her grandfather, the author unpacks his personal history during the Civil Rights Movement and the Great Migration—one that paved the way for generations to come. Read his story and listen to excerpts from the interview.

Image is not available

The Mid-weekly is a newsletter feature produced by our team to provide up-to-date content from our staff directly to your inbox. Consider supporting our 501(c)(3) by subscribing to the newsletter! View sample issue here.

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Don’t cry over spilled milk? Well, maybe we should. COVID-19 is forcing us to re-examine systems that have been in place for hundreds of years, including the grocery.

Image is not available

Toledo has some name recognition (Holy Toledo!, anyone?), but most know very little about the Glass City besides what they see on TV. When has Toledo made it to the big screen and how does TV influence the way the world sees Toledo, for better or for worse?

Image is not available

The U.S. employs over 18 million health care professionals. Let's keep them safe. #StayAtHome #SaveLives #InThisTogether

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The path that brought us to Toledo was a winding one. In a way, you could say that we were brought here by the birth of our first child. Our beautiful baby girl was born on the evening of August 20th, 2016 in Bismarck, North Dakota.

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The Latest
Creative Multimedia Storytelling + Solutions-oriented Projects

After Industry: The Unusual Rebirth of Mansfield, Ohio

Nestled in the center of Northern Ohio, Mansfield has fallen in and out of fame over the years. Now, however, the small city perhaps most well known for being the backdrop for The Shawshank Redemption is making use of its post-industrial heritage for an unlikely comeback industry: tourism.  The city first made a name for itself in the 19th century...

How Small-town Ohio Became the Home of Pop Culture—and an Entirely New Discipline

Where can you find nearly every issue of MAD Magazine, Twin Peaks trading cards and a Star Trek tie? Perhaps more likely to be found in a childhood bedroom of decades past or your dad’s basement, these treasures and more are part of the Browne Popular Culture Library’s (BPCL) collection, located in Bowling Green State University’s Jerome Library. Founded...

Staying Afloat: The Future of Funding for Local Journalism

As a local activist and network engineer, Sean Nestor recognizes the importance of access to information. But even as an internet expert, he was unable to find basic information on Toledo city government while conducting research on labor ordinances. Now, he worries his community’s recent history is fading away.  “Anybody trying to find out what the culture and the views...

Bollywood, Hollywood and the Globalization of Socially-conscious Film: A Review of 3 Idiots

Amidst ever-increasing globalization, American audiences are slowly beginning to recognize international film industries, as evidenced by South Korea’s Parasite (2019) being the first non-English-language film to win the Academy Award for Best Picture. As production companies pull rights for their content to start their own streaming services, platforms like Amazon Prime Video have found competitive avenues through hosting international...

Editor's Picks

Finding Home: From Korea to Toledo, Ohio

Hi, how may I serve you? 저희 치킨 하나랑 빵 하나랑 샐러드 하나 주세요... "Finding Home" is a narrative about a girl’s experience from immigrating from Korea to Midwestern America. It...

Trailblazers of the Great Black Swamp: 31 Miles, 31 Taverns

If you’ve ever driven from Perrysburg to Fremont or Fremont to Perrysburg—or anywhere along the way, for that matter—you’ve experienced a pleasant, roughly 40-minute drive that’s a straight shot...

The Cannaley Treehouse Project: A Space of Intersection

The “midstory” is the middle tier in a canopy of trees—a balancing force that provides coverage to the lower story and support for the upper. It is a place...
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All Aboard: Reimagining Toledo & Its Union Station

A few specks of dust hang in the air of Toledo’s train station, still and silent, exposed by a light that gleams from the nearby window. “Peaceful” and “pristine”...

Latest COVID-19 Updates

If you've seen 𝘛𝘩𝘦 𝘚𝘩𝘢𝘸𝘴𝘩𝘢𝘯𝘬 𝘙𝘦𝘥𝘦𝘮𝘱𝘵𝘪𝘰𝘯, you've seen Mansfield, Ohio. But the city also boasts a rich history and promising future as it redefines its identity in the post-industrial era.
https://www.midstory.org/after-industry-the-unusual-rebirth-of-mansfield-ohio/

"The prevailing narrative I’ve been told throughout my upbringing about the Midwest by politicians, media personalities and the like has been one of decay—of industry vanished, of livelihoods lost, of populations shrinking."
https://www.midstory.org/my-long-distance-love-for-ohio/

Vintage whiskey bottles, faded newspaper clippings & lengthy historical descriptions are perhaps most likely to be found in an eclectic museum. But Toledo’s history buffs have found an unlikely place for archiving, research & lasting connection: Facebook.
https://www.midstory.org/toledos-timeline-historians/

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