As protests and unrest continue, Midstory considers the Midwestern identity and the role the region has historically played in civil rights progress.

The Toledo Museum of Art exhibition program brought together a special presentation of Yayoi Kusama’s Fireflies on the Water installation, just for a global pandemic to hit soon after. Despite what seemed to be a major set-back, COVID-19 has instead transformed Fireflies on the Water into a deeper reflection into what isolation and the individual mean in the chaos of 2020. What was once an incomprehensible escapist dream is now a sober dissolution into universal existentialism.

Connie Schultz’s debut novel intricately showcases not only the hardships, but also the dignity and resilience of the lives of small, working-class, Midwestern towns and the women who inhabit them.

As COVID-19 cases rise across the nation, masks (and requiring citizens to wear them) have become a major point of contention. We speak with Dr. Jeffrey Shaman, a professor of environmental health sciences and an infectious disease modeler at the Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health, about the use of masks and other ways to slow and prevent the transmission of COVID-19.

For decades, the Midwest was the example of perfect, accent-less English. Now, increasing dialectic quirks are changing that perception, and with it, Midwestern identity.

Through conversations with her grandfather, the author unpacks his personal history during the Civil Rights Movement and the Great Migration—one that paved the way for generations to come. Read his story and listen to excerpts from the interview.

Don’t cry over spilled milk? Well, maybe we should. COVID-19 is forcing us to re-examine systems that have been in place for hundreds of years, including the grocery. But the grocery storefront is just a window into the unprecedented social and economic pressures we are facing as global citizens. In this two-part series, we talk about the evolution of the grocery store and how the current crisis is affecting the massive food network behind it.

Toledo has some name recognition (Holy Toledo!, anyone?), but most know very little about the Glass City besides what they may see on TV. When has Toledo made it to the big screen and how does TV influence the way the world sees Toledo, for better or for worse?

The path that brought us to Toledo was a winding one. In a way, you could say that we were brought here by the birth of our first child. Our beautiful baby girl was born on the evening of August 20th, 2016 in Bismarck, North Dakota.

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We inform.

We interpret.

We inspire.

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As protests and unrest continue, Midstory considers the Midwestern identity and the role the region has historically played in civil rights progress.

Image is not available

The Toledo Museum of Art exhibition program brought together a special presentation of Yayoi Kusama’s Fireflies on the Water installation, just for a global pandemic to hit soon after.

Image is not available

Connie Schultz’s debut novel intricately showcases not only the hardships, but also the dignity and resilience of the lives of small, working-class, Midwestern towns and the women who inhabit them.

Image is not available

As COVID-19 cases rise across the nation, masks (and requiring citizens to wear them) have become a major point of contention. We speak with Dr. Jeffrey Shaman (Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health) about the use of masks and other ways to slow and prevent the transmission of COVID-19.

Image is not available

In 2014, more than half a million people were left without clean drinking water for three days after a harmful algal bloom took over Lake Erie. But behind the bloom is a history long-forgotten and a hopeful future of coexistence and collaboration. This film is the result of a 2019 collaboration with WGTE Public Media.

Image is not available

For decades, the Midwest was the example of perfect, accent-less English. Now, increasing dialectic quirks are changing that perception, and with it, Midwestern identity.

Image is not available

Through conversations with her grandfather, the author unpacks his personal history during the Civil Rights Movement and the Great Migration—one that paved the way for generations to come. Read his story and listen to excerpts from the interview.

Image is not available

The Mid-weekly is a newsletter feature produced by our team to provide up-to-date content from our staff directly to your inbox. Consider supporting our 501(c)(3) by subscribing to the newsletter! View sample issue here.

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Journalism has seen intense difficulties over the last decade, but the current crisis has shown just how important that work is and how newsrooms are innovating to keep it going. We chat with Joe Stephens, award-winning reporter and Founding Director of Princeton University's Program in Journalism.

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Don’t cry over spilled milk? Well, maybe we should. COVID-19 is forcing us to re-examine systems that have been in place for hundreds of years, including the grocery.

Image is not available

Toledo has some name recognition (Holy Toledo!, anyone?), but most know very little about the Glass City besides what they see on TV. When has Toledo made it to the big screen and how does TV influence the way the world sees Toledo, for better or for worse?

Image is not available

The U.S. employs over 18 million health care professionals. Let's keep them safe. #StayAtHome #SaveLives #InThisTogether

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The path that brought us to Toledo was a winding one. In a way, you could say that we were brought here by the birth of our first child. Our beautiful baby girl was born on the evening of August 20th, 2016 in Bismarck, North Dakota.

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The Latest
Creative Multimedia Storytelling + Solutions-oriented Projects

Charity Appeal: Celebrity Influence in Times of Crisis

It might seem counterintuitive that entertainment and cultural icons thrive during tremendous times of hardship, but history has proven it true.  During the Great Depression, for instance, an estimated 60 to 80 million Americans went to the cinemas weekly, and from the grim realities of the economic crash of 1929 rose a new American...

Entropic Peace in Isolation: Revisiting Yayoi Kusama’s Fireflies on the Water in 2020

The Toledo Museum of Art exhibition program brought together a special presentation of Yayoi Kusama’s Fireflies on the Water installation, just for a global pandemic to hit soon after. Despite what seemed to be a major set-back, COVID-19 has instead transformed Fireflies on the Water into a deeper reflection into what isolation and the individual mean in the chaos of 2020. What was once an incomprehensible escapist dream is now a sober dissolution into universal existentialism.

The 2020 Election Dilemma: How Ohio has Handled Voting During the Pandemic

The 2020 presidential election stands to be one of the most complex and highly anticipated U.S. elections in recent history, primarily because the pandemic has made the administration of elections very difficult (not to mention the contentious race between candidates). State officials have been scrambling to find an effective, accessible and safe means of administering the elections...

Toledo ABCs

Toledo ABCs is a mini-series that highlights, from A to Z, just a sampling of those aspects that make Toledo unique and, in some cases, world-renowned. Designed to be viewed individually or as a set, the graphics use archival images, photography and white space constrained by typeface outlines to memorialize the beauty and significance in what we often might see as mundane.

Editor's Picks

Becoming Michael’s, from Ellis Island to Toledo

When I was in third grade, I remember my parents being asked at a parent-teacher conference why I always talked about “hanging out at the bar.” On the one...

All Aboard: Reimagining Toledo & Its Union Station

A few specks of dust hang in the air of Toledo’s train station, still and silent, exposed by a light that gleams from the nearby window. “Peaceful”...

Are We Still “Draining”?: An Introduction to The Demography Project

The Toledo Demography Project is a collaborative effort between the Midstory team and researchers from various universities in the region. Lead researchers on the project are Victor Ogundipe, a Data Analytics Lead at the University of Michigan, and Mingyang Liu, a survey statistician in the Office of Institutional Research at the University of Toledo.

Martin Luther King, Jr.’s Toledo Legacy

While Martin Luther King, Jr. only visited Toledo once, his name, influence and image remain in this city as remnants of the values he lived and died...

"...rural and urban areas in the Midwest may as well be different regions—the adjacent conservative heartland and progressive-leaning urban centers make states like Ohio swing differently each election."
https://www.midstory.org/the-politics-of-midwestern-identity-racial-divides/

Congratulations to all the finalists!
Awards were presented to the following:
2020 Nonprofit Innovation Award - Midstory
2020 Nonprofit Excellence in a Small Organization - Baby University
2020 Nonprofit Excellence in a Large Organization - Bittersweet Farms

2020 Nonprofit Innovation & Excellence Awards Ceremony by GTCF.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NoFGTzNcB6k

Including @midstory, winner of the non-profit innovation award, for remote summer internship programming

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Video
Videos that explore the post-industrial landscape and the many narratives within

COVID-19 Risk Assessment for Ohio: Identifying Risks for Ongoing Reopening and Resilience to Future Hazards

As our researchers watched Ohio’s response to the pandemic, they wished to contribute meaningfully toward the next stage of disaster response and help to prepare our state for future crises. This risk assessment brief is a comprehensive look, county by county, of factors that put Ohio’s populations at risk for COVID-19, including socio-economic status, mobility, race, overcrowded housing and more.

Film, Storytelling & the Midwest: A One-on-one with Brandon Li

The Midstory Team chats with Brandon Li, a travel videographer, about his unique style of filmmaking, the impacts of the pandemic on the travel and videography industry and his perspective as a nomad who grew up in and left the Midwest.

Public Libraries: Reopening & Addressing Social Inequities

The Midstory Team chats with Jason Kucsma, the director of the Toledo Lucas County Public Library, about the evolving role of the libraries during the crisis, the move of library resources toward digital infrastructure and considerations on policies for reopening.

What We Can Learn from Taiwan’s COVID-19 Response

The Midstory Team chats with Dr. Shao-Hsuan Hsia, the director of the Division of Pediatric Respiratory Therapy and the Chief of the Pediatric Intensive Care Unit at Chang Gung Memorial Hospital in Taipei, about Taiwan's response to the pandemic, social responsibilities and the state of public health in Taiwan.

Art & Resiliency: Museums in the Age of COVID-19

The Midstory Team chats with Adam Levine, the director of The Toledo Museum of Art, about the future of art and museums, including the role of digital presentation, utilization of outdoor spaces and shifts in artistic expression in times of crisis.

Preventative Care: Advice from an E.R. Physician

From the Midstory studio, our team chats with ER physician and a practitioner of integrative medicine, Dr. Jen Pfleghaar about the situation in the hospital and ER, integrative medicine and staying healthy during this pandemic.

Stories empower.

They uplift.

They clarify.

Projects
Solutions-oriented, research-based projects in collaboration with leading experts and academics

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