Amidst severe crises, the world of journalism has changed—for better and for worse. There are struggles with aging organizational models and, even more so, in the fundamental role of news in an ever-changing world. The Local Journalism Project is an investigation of the current state of local journalism, with a focus on the Midwest, exploring causes of decline and possibilities for restoration & innovation.

As protests and unrest continue, Midstory considers the Midwestern identity and the role the region has historically played in civil rights progress.

Amidst ever-increasing globalization, American audiences are slowly beginning to recognize international film industries, as evidenced by South Korea’s Parasite (2019) being the first non-English-language film to win the Academy Award for Best Picture. As production companies pull rights for their content to start their own streaming services, platforms like Amazon Prime Video have found competitive avenues through hosting international films and television (think K-drama and European crime shows), opening up accessibility to global film industries.

What does transportation look like from here? In the first installment in a series examining the future of public transit post-COVID-19, Midstory Fellow Stefan Binion talks with Stu Nicholson, Executive Director of All Aboard Ohio!, about what current discussions are amidst the pandemic and re-opening, from accessibility to the environment.

Connie Schultz’s debut novel intricately showcases not only the hardships, but also the dignity and resilience of the lives of small, working-class, Midwestern towns and the women who inhabit them.

As COVID-19 cases rise across the nation, masks (and requiring citizens to wear them) have become a major point of contention. We speak with Dr. Jeffrey Shaman, a professor of environmental health sciences and an infectious disease modeler at the Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health, about the use of masks and other ways to slow and prevent the transmission of COVID-19.

For decades, the Midwest was the example of perfect, accent-less English. Now, increasing dialectic quirks are changing that perception, and with it, Midwestern identity.

Through conversations with her grandfather, the author unpacks his personal history during the Civil Rights Movement and the Great Migration—one that paved the way for generations to come. Read his story and listen to excerpts from the interview.

Don’t cry over spilled milk? Well, maybe we should. COVID-19 is forcing us to re-examine systems that have been in place for hundreds of years, including the grocery. But the grocery storefront is just a window into the unprecedented social and economic pressures we are facing as global citizens. In this two-part series, we talk about the evolution of the grocery store and how the current crisis is affecting the massive food network behind it.

Toledo has some name recognition (Holy Toledo!, anyone?), but most know very little about the Glass City besides what they may see on TV. When has Toledo made it to the big screen and how does TV influence the way the world sees Toledo, for better or for worse?

The path that brought us to Toledo was a winding one. In a way, you could say that we were brought here by the birth of our first child. Our beautiful baby girl was born on the evening of August 20th, 2016 in Bismarck, North Dakota.

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Amidst severe crises, the world of journalism has changed—for better and for worse. There are struggles with aging organizational models and, even more so, in the fundamental role of news in an ever-changing world.

Image is not available

As protests and unrest continue, Midstory considers the Midwestern identity and the role the region has historically played in civil rights progress.

Image is not available

Amidst ever-increasing globalization, American audiences are slowly beginning to recognize international film industries, as evidenced by South Korea’s Parasite (2019) being the first non-English-language film to win the Academy Award for Best Picture.

Image is not available

What does transportation look like from here? In the first installment in a series examining the future of public transit post-COVID-19.

Image is not available

Connie Schultz’s debut novel intricately showcases not only the hardships, but also the dignity and resilience of the lives of small, working-class, Midwestern towns and the women who inhabit them.

Image is not available

As COVID-19 cases rise across the nation, masks (and requiring citizens to wear them) have become a major point of contention. We speak with Dr. Jeffrey Shaman (Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health) about the use of masks and other ways to slow and prevent the transmission of COVID-19.

Image is not available

In 2014, more than half a million people were left without clean drinking water for three days after a harmful algal bloom took over Lake Erie. But behind the bloom is a history long-forgotten and a hopeful future of coexistence and collaboration. This film is the result of a 2019 collaboration with WGTE Public Media.

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For decades, the Midwest was the example of perfect, accent-less English. Now, increasing dialectic quirks are changing that perception, and with it, Midwestern identity.

Image is not available

Through conversations with her grandfather, the author unpacks his personal history during the Civil Rights Movement and the Great Migration—one that paved the way for generations to come. Read his story and listen to excerpts from the interview.

Image is not available

The Mid-weekly is a newsletter feature produced by our team to provide up-to-date content from our staff directly to your inbox. Consider supporting our 501(c)(3) by subscribing to the newsletter! View sample issue here.

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Don’t cry over spilled milk? Well, maybe we should. COVID-19 is forcing us to re-examine systems that have been in place for hundreds of years, including the grocery.

Image is not available

Toledo has some name recognition (Holy Toledo!, anyone?), but most know very little about the Glass City besides what they see on TV. When has Toledo made it to the big screen and how does TV influence the way the world sees Toledo, for better or for worse?

Image is not available

The U.S. employs over 18 million health care professionals. Let's keep them safe. #StayAtHome #SaveLives #InThisTogether

Image is not available

The path that brought us to Toledo was a winding one. In a way, you could say that we were brought here by the birth of our first child. Our beautiful baby girl was born on the evening of August 20th, 2016 in Bismarck, North Dakota.

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The Latest
Creative Multimedia Storytelling + Solutions-oriented Projects

Building the Midwest’s “Little Tokyo” in Novi, Michigan

Michigan may not seem to be the most likely place for authentic Asian cuisine and experiences, but developers and city leaders in the city of Novi hope that Sakura Novi, a new mixed-use development featuring Japanese and other Asian businesses, will foster cross-cultural connections and support the Asian expatriate community there. The development will be the first of its kind in Michigan and one of only a few in the Midwest. Cover graphic courtesy of sakuranovi.com.
00:22:42

“I’m having that baby!” | Barbara Piperata & Emily Wolfe-Sherrie

Our last episode of the series brings life to the fore in a time of disease and death. Midstory talks to Dr. Barbara Piperata, professor of anthropology at the Ohio State University, and graduate student Emily Wolfe-Sherrie about what motherhood and bringing new life into the world look like under the strains of quarantine, as well as how cultural constructs shaping women’s postpartum experiences reflect back on society as a whole.

Ecologist Leslie Brandt on How Urban Forests Can Help Us Adapt to Climate Change

Northern Wisconsin is dotted with lakes formed by glaciers, low-lying areas carpeted with peat moss and cranberries, wetland and upland areas lush with conifers and hardwoods—red and white pines, spruce, fir, paper birch, Tamarack, sugar maples, beech.   This landscape lies just on the precipice of the Boreal forests, ecosystems that, at the southern extent of their range, are particularly vulnerable...
00:22:14

“The margins of subsistence” | Andrea Seielstad & Catherine Crosby

How does someone “shelter in place” when shelter isn’t safe, or there’s no shelter to stay in? Midstory talks to Andrea Seielstad, professor at the University of Dayton School of Law, and Catherine Crosby, Chief of Staff of the City of Toledo, about evictions, food insecurity, domestic violence and homelessness during the pandemic.
00:19:22

“The luxury of hindsight” | Anne Sokolsky

At a time when travel is rendered impossible, literature can take us places. Midstory talks to Dr. Anne Sokolsky, professor of Comparative Literature at Ohio Wesleyan University, about the stories born of past pandemics and the importance of telling our stories today—through broader and more diverse means than ever before.

Editor's Picks

20/20 Vision: The Ambition & Execution of “Comprehensive Planning” in Toledo

If you made it past the front page of The Blade in mid-May, 2000, you might have spotted a curious advertisement. Among concerts, hair loss treatments and hypnosis for...

Social Distances: Introduction

Social distance…it means more than just six feet apart. What other kinds of distances did we encounter during 2020 and beyond? Join Midstory as we interview experts in the...

Trailblazers of the Great Black Swamp: 31 Miles, 31 Taverns

If you’ve ever driven from Perrysburg to Fremont or Fremont to Perrysburg—or anywhere along the way, for that matter—you’ve experienced a pleasant, roughly 40-minute drive that’s a straight shot...

Waiting for Toledo’s Tomorrow

Seventy-four years after the opening of an exhibit promising Toledoans a bright, monumental future, the city still awaits its tomorrow.

Latest COVID-19 Updates

"The recent ambitious infrastructure plan seeks to use EVs to rein in greenhouse gas emissions and revitalize the post-pandemic economy...Ohio has the opportunity to leverage this trend to its benefit, but not without challenges on the road ahead."
https://www.midstory.org/how-ohio-is-paving-the-road-for-its-electric-vehicle-industry/

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Videos that explore the post-industrial landscape and the many narratives within

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Projects
Solutions-oriented, research-based projects in collaboration with leading experts and academics

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