Art & Culture

The Rise, Fall and Lasting Wonder of the Drive-in

The drive-in is an icon of twentieth-century American entertainment. Since the height of their popularity in the ‘50s and subsequent decline as real estate costs rose and technology advanced, drive-in theaters have gotten creative — and even made a brief comeback as a socially-distanced, open-air pandemic pastime.

Toledo’s Jazz Scene Is Roaring Once Again

In a dark room sit clusters of circular wooden tables and chairs while a handful of vintage lamps radiate warm light. A red upholstered banquette runs along a dark wall, reminiscent of a century ago. But the focus of the room is a gleaming, black piano on a stage enveloped with red curtains, a platform designed to transport audiences to Toledo, Ohio’s golden era — and envision its next one.

One Man’s Quest to Make “America’s Museum” in Youngstown, Ohio

In the early 20th century, Americans were infatuated with international (read: European) art, as people clamored to buy pieces by famous artists like Renoir and Monet. It wasn’t until 1919 that the first institute dedicated solely to American art opened in Youngstown, OH. The Butler Institute of Art is still one of Ohio’s most popular museums today, and the rich history of its founder, Joseph G. Butler Jr., led to the Institute’s focus on representation and access for all Americans.

Reviving a Lost Indigenous Language

When Daryl Baldwin was growing up, the last speakers of his heritage language were passing away; as of a few decades ago, that language...

A Tale of Two Toledos

In 1931, Toledoans in their small Ohio city were facing the second year of the Great Depression. They saw an economy that had thrived...

The Art of Publishing Midwestern Literature

When Robert James Russell, a Michigander, went to England to study American Modernism, he found that in the curriculum “there was kind of a...

Booktown: Ann Arbor’s Enduring Literary Legacy

Picture the perfect bookstore. Are you standing in New York City, facing the miles of shelves that make up the Strand? Are you imagining...

When Pandemic Hit, Libraries Were There — And for More Than Just Books

When 2020 hit, it seemed like no one was prepared for what was to come. Except, maybe, libraries.  Not to say the pandemic didn’t hit...

The People’s Mural of Columbus

Off of Main Street on Columbus’ East Side, a colorful, Midnight Marauders-esque mural overlooked a crowd gathered despite the growing heat of the August...

Snaps & Taps: How Black Artists Paved the Way for Slam Poetry in Columbus

In 1956, President Eisenhower signed the Federal Aid Highway Act into law, authorizing one of the largest public works programs in the nation’s history:...

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