CATEGORY

Projects

The Return of the Algal Bloom: What’s Been Going on Since 2014?

Apparently green is the new blue, at least for Lake Erie in the summer....

Abbott’s Absence: Faithless Electors and the Politics of Change in the Buckeye State

It’s 1812. Despite attaining statehood only nine years ago, Ohio is quickly becoming an important political force. Thanks to a rapidly growing...

Voting in the Midwest: The Transformative Force of Race and Class

At first glance, the Midwest seems to be undergoing an electoral shift to the right. This change in voting attitudes manifested itself in 2016; in a single election, many Midwestern states—with the exception of Illinois and Minnesota—flipped from “blue” to “red” on the electoral map. But the region’s electoral history shows a much more complicated position.

Mobility in Crisis, Part II: Could Disaster Transform Toledo’s Bus System?

Read Part I, "Public Health, Transit and Investment," here. COVID-19 has decimated public transportation in cities nationwide;...

Mobility in Crisis, Part I: Public Health, Transit and Investment

From airlines to subways, mass transit is particularly ill-suited to the social distancing practices that help stem COVID-19’s spread, so it doesn’t come as a shock that the transportation sector has struggled to navigate the pandemic. And for transit systems nationwide, it’s a bitter pill to swallow: where public transportation was most successful, it now seems most threatening—and threatened.

Hidden in Plain Sight: the Great Black Swamp of Northwest Ohio

In 2014, more than half a million people were left without clean drinking water for three days after a harmful algal bloom took over Lake Erie. But behind the bloom is a history long-forgotten and a hopeful future of coexistence and collaboration. This film is the result of a 2019 collaboration with WGTE Public Media.

20/20 Vision: The Ambition & Execution of “Comprehensive Planning” in Toledo

If you made it past the front page of The Blade in mid-May, 2000, you might have spotted a curious advertisement. Among...

Voices

by Millenia Terrell Hear… See… Voices can be more than what we hear Voices can be something we see Voices can move...

Kennedi’s Story: Making a Choice

Kennedi is a rising first-year at the University of Toledo. In this essay, she talks about choosing between staying in the MESP...

Why I Chose Toledo

By De'Vonn Battle De'Vonn is an incoming freshman and a part of the Multicultural Emerging Scholars Program at...

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COVID-19 Risk Assessment for Ohio: Identifying Risks for Ongoing Reopening and Resilience to Future Hazards

As our researchers watched Ohio’s response to the pandemic, they wished to contribute meaningfully toward the next stage of disaster response and help to prepare our state for future crises. This risk assessment brief is a comprehensive look, county by county, of factors that put Ohio’s populations at risk for COVID-19, including socio-economic status, mobility, race, overcrowded housing and more.

Can We Be Re-infected with COVID-19? Answers from Immune System Experts

Recently, reported cases of “re-infection”—people testing positive only months after a previous instance of COVID-19—have led to worries about how our immune system responds to COVID-19. We speak with Dr. Akiko Iwasaki, a professor of immunobiology from Yale School of Medicine, and Dr. Sydney Ramirez, a researcher at La Jolla Institute for Immunology, about our immune response and immunity to COVID-19.

Billboards and the Re-imagination of the American Landscape

Few things are quite as Midwestern as long, open roads on monotonously flat stretches of land, broken up by fantastically mismatched billboards...

The Return of the Algal Bloom: What’s Been Going on Since 2014?

Apparently green is the new blue, at least for Lake Erie in the summer....

Ope! The Midwest on Twitter

Geography, politics and demographics are all typical ways we define regions, but Twitter account @midwestern_ope demonstrates a more creative approach: jokes, memes & good ol’ fashioned self-deprecation that make fun of but also highlight the people and day-to-day characteristics of the Midwest. In the process, these tweets highlight Midwestern identity in a manner often left out of the national conversation recently focused on the region’s politics.